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A life, or lives, were lost - the Master was held to be free from blame. I am sure that the Inquiry would have recorded the 1888 ownership correctly, a puzzle because link 2 indicates that from 1886/1891 the vessel was owned by Rowland & Marwood's Steamship Co. & that the vessel was then sold to Osborn & Wallis. Brischitti' (who may be the agents only), likely of Naples, Italy, & renamed Perseveranza.

The business recommenced also as 'Robert Thompson & Sons', in 1846 at North Sands, with the same three sons. Thompson & Sons Ltd.' I further understand that the 'Crown' yard (Strand Slipway) was a neighbouring yard, located to the immediate west of that of Joseph L. Keith advises that Burton Brown, became the owner of all 64 shares on Nov.

In 1840 the business name became Robert Thompson & Sons, but the business 'had a brief existence owing to depression'. The vessel is of especial interest to the webmaster, since John & Anthony Cockerill are ancestors of Sunderland author & site contributor Keith Cockerill, whose slide shows are featured on site (1 & 2).

The Captain, his wife & the crew were rescued by the Sennen lifeboat. in 'The Leisure Hour' in 1902 stated there was no adequate reason as to why the collision occurred & the weather was clear at the time. The weather is also said to have been poor but the light could be seen for at least 2 miles.

6, 1904 at Tongmi Point, which seems to be on the coast of China, near Hong Kong.

For ease of understanding, I will number the various Thompsons! The webmaster has a number of 'Lloyd's Registers' available to him ex Google books (see left). long, a man's bust as a figurehead, intended it would seem for service to the Baltic.

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Naworth Castle 'was so seriously injured she sank like a stone'. long overall, launched by Mrs Lindsay related presumably to 'Lindsay, Gracie & Co.' of Newcastle, who ordered the ship. Mc Mullen in command, en route from Nome, Alaska, to Tacoma, Washington, with a cargo of copper concentrate ex copper mines at La Touche Island (W. He was severely reprimanded by the Court but was permitted to retain his master's certificate.

Robert #1 died in 1860 at the relatively young age of 63, & that same year John retired from the business, which then came under the control of Joseph Lowes Thompson #1, the one son left in the business. At about 1893, Joseph Lowes Thompson #2 retired due to ill health, and his 3 sons continued the business under the leadership of Robert Thompson #3. In 1946, a brochure entitled 'One Hundred Years of Joseph L. There is also something hanging from the end of the spear.' The button is not very big (about 25 mm diameter) & the detail is small! In that regard I have read (a large 'pdf' file, page 14) that in 1946, 'J. If you can add to the record, your contribution would be most welcome. At top left is a page from the booklet 'One Hundred Years of Joseph L. Thompson and Sons Ltd.' but see other links re such artwork. of Glasgow, Scotland, became the vessel's owner for service to Australia. 10, 1868, the vessel left Calcutta, India, with a cargo of rice for Port Louis, Mauritius. 11, 1868, while still at Port Louis unloading her cargo, a violent hurricane hit the area, as a result of which the vessel 'parted from her anchors', was driven ashore & became 'utterly wrecked'. Built by Robert Thompson (1797-1860) for & named after, I presume, Edmund Graham, ship owner, of Newcastle, who certainly owned the vessel in 1858 per Christie's Shipping Register. 5, 1865, when at Bombay, India, the vessel, loaded with cotton & ready for sea, was damaged by Innisfallen (built in 1864 at West Hartlepool by Pile Spence & Co.) which broke her moorings in high winds & hit Edmund Graham amidships, causing considerable damage. The vessel's position was established at noon that day, & a course set for a point 8 1/2 miles S. The captain 'was not in the habit of consulting with any of his officers with regard to the navigation of the ship', & the chief officer did not calculate the ship's latitude. A most unusual incident - actually hitting the rock. ), the ship broke her back behind the bridge, her stern disappearing underwater. 9, 1898, at about midnight, while en route from Plymouth to Cardiff, in ballast, the vessel grounded at Longships Lighthouse 1 1/4 miles off Land's End, Cornwall. The wreck lies on the western side of the rocks in 12 metres of water. I spotted a reference to negligence being the cause, presumably established by an official inquiry. The wreck sat perched there for over a year, I read. 14, 1899, I think that is correct, per Lockett Graham (thanks! ), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 29, 1884, an Inquiry was held, (#2099 see left), into damage that the vessel sustained in a hurricane, when en route from 'Dantzig' (Gdańsk, Poland), to Boston, U. The date of the damage was not indicated but probably was in very early 1884.